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Nicole Asensio Rock music’s femme fatale

In this generation, there are a handful of young artists who break onto scene with their exceptional talent, usually creating their own unique brand that separates them from all the rest. Take classical singer turned rock chick Nicole Asensio for example. 

It was in 2010 when we first met Nicole and her band, General Luna. They were performing at the Teatrino Bar in Greenhills when they were introduced as the next music stars to watch out for. 

With their killer looks, the first impression was that the ladies were just Pussycat Dolls wannabes, but onstage they showed something so appealing about them that you would consider their sex appeal as just their secondary asset. 

At the backstage, Nicole told us how the band got its name, “Our band name was inspired by the lunar eclipse we saw when we were on a road trip. And yes, it doesn’t have something to do with the famous Philippine hero.”

ROCK CHICK. Classically trained rock singer and songwriter Nicole Asensio debuts on the cover of a popular men's magazine (below) as part of her reinvention a solo artist. Photos from Nicole's Instagram.

Since that night, the band went on to perform in bigger venues and numerous music festivals in and around the country before it went on permanent hiatus in the last quarter of 2013. Her connection with her band mates didn’t stop there though. She is still in constant communication with them and works with them once in a while. Sure she misses working with her band.

“I find myself more creative when working with a group,” she said.

Still out presenting herself as a rock chick, Nicole resurfaced in 2015, but this time as a solo artist. She released her debut solo album, Schizoprano, a portmanteau of the words schizophrenic and soprano and inspired by her musical background. 

Nicole was trained in classical music and opera.  She is also songwriter herself. Growing up in a family of classical and Broadway singers, she loves the same genre but fuses it with rock. And it is easier to understand because Nicole, according to her previous interview with Manila Standard is a person “who is a fan on fusion and reinvention.” She must have been inspired by soprano Fides Cuyugan Asensio and singer/actor Cocoy Laurel since their blood as legendary musicians runs in Nicole’s veins. She is Fides’s granddaughter and Coco’s niece.

 “There’s a time when you need to step out of your comfort zone and learn from other musicians. And when it comes to supportive musical friends, I am blessed. Musically, I feel more free to collaborate and venture off sound wise – so that’s a plus,” Nicole said.

And in speaking of reinvention, the singer, also known as Diwata among her supporters after appearing in the music video of Abra and Chito Miranda’s song “Diwata,” continues to reevaluate herself by making a clear statement on her latest magazine cover – she’s one sexy rocker chick, a force to be reckoned with.

Nicole is FHM’s September muse. In the cover, the singer appears to be almost naked and is only covered by white laced cloth. And in the magazine’s latest issue, she talked about musical reinvention and her struggles as a solo artist. 

“I do feel like it was time but that didn’t make it any easier because I didn’t know how to be a solo artist. I like being in a band. I do miss the girls. Being on the road, traveling together, getting to know each other so well that it hurts. I’m still in touch with a few of my General Luna bandmates.”

Meanwhile the feature article describes Nicole as a soulful songstress who has an otherworldly talent, a sound and voice that helps keep her in the limelight. And that was an apt description of Nicole, and many could no longer wait on else she would dish out as a solo sexy rocker.

Topics: Nicole Asensio , Rock music , Schizoprano , FHM
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